Compressor For 18gal tank

Hey all. Currently I have a 5 gal tank and the shocker horn through horn blasters…

I was looking to purchase a K5 horn. I was going to keep the 5 gal tank for the horn blasters and I found a 18 gal tank online for a cheap price. There is no compressor though. I dont really want to buy more than 1 compressor for that 18gal tank. Would only 1 compressor work? I seen that Viar states 1 compressor per 5 gallons… But would it be possible for the compressor to work for an 18 gal tank… I found a Viar 444c and they stat it has a 100% duty for 100psi and 55% for 200psi. I’m going to be setting the pressure switch at 120max 90 min.

Thanks in advance.

An oasis compressor is a serious contender & would fill that tank quickly, but it’s also serious money.

Thanks for the quick reply… Is there a compressor that will work that is under 200$? Also I see you have a set of k5 with a 5 gal tank… How well does it work with your system

You should have chosen “BigBadWolf” as a username. You’re gonna huff and puff the whole town down with a kit like that! Welcome to the forum. I like your style - start huge and work up from there :smiley:

Have to agree with Stinky on this. Go with an Oasis or an EDC. You could probably get quicker fill rate and a slightly cheaper price by buying two packs of the dual OBD2 kits (i.e. four compressors; rated at 5gal each). Whole lot more mucking around though. When you’re spending those kind of dollars on an air supply system you may as well go with the best - and that’s undoubtedly an Oasis XD4000. … Queue Dan the man from Oasis for further comment.:wink:

Thanks for the quick reply. Is there a “serious” compressor without spending “serious” money. I’m looking for 1 compressor and maybe 2 max. I’m looking for around 200$ and 250$ being the max. I work as a firefighter for a living, so im not made out of money haha

I did notice you have a 5 gal tank with your K5 (reading your sig) How well does that work for your K5’s? Maybe I can run a second 5 gal tank and compressor setup and have a total of 10gal for both tanks?

After watching some of these youtube videos, some of these guys are blowing horns for almost a min of the video. (not a steady blast, but every few secs for a few secs and the video being a few miin long)

Here is some examples…

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UUNnC-9XMnI&list=FLyu87TzMts4MYhiDHQEiJxA&index=1

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AobOKrXlNRE

Basically - No.
You could try and shop around for a 2nd hand York 210 and rig it up as an EDC. That’s about the cheapest I’ve seen people do it.

Apart from that you are always limited to the 5 gal. per compressor warranty issue. You can see a bit of an overview of the compressor options here.

18 gallons is a huge amount of air to fill - especially on a budget. Don’t know how much you’re looking at honking that K5, but 10 gallons with a dual compressor pack should work quite nicely. If that stretches your budget too much then I’d say stick to 5 gallons and perhaps an OB2.

Even with the EDC that I’m running (Extreme Outback EDC) you’re still looking to spend about $1000 for the kit.

Either this one or the Oasis will do what you need, just not at your price point.

-Kris

thanks guys… im looking at a york 210… that was one of my original plans… but im not sure exactly how easy it will be to get a mounting bracket, and run belts and have a clutch… ect…

i have a 2011 v8 Chevy silverado. i found plenty of york 210’s for less than 100 dollars…
can anyone give me details on how to run the york with the belts, ect…

also, a york should be able to handle the 18 gal tank at 150 psi max… correct?

A York 210 should fill 18 gallons from 0 to 150 psi in about 3.5 minutes when its crankshaft is turning around 1500 RPM. You will need an electric clutch controlled by a pressure switch along with a belt and pulley system.

Some people fabricate their own mounting brackets. Be aware - the York must be mounted upright because they’re oil lubricated and the oil level needs to be checked regularly.

I ran dual yorks on my tahoe. Right now its just one until i have the time to revisit the belt system.

All GM trucks/SUV’s from 2007 to 2013 (NNBS) are the same under the hood for the 4.8, 5.3, 6.0, and 6.2. The duramax is not however.

So if you have a gas engine, just look what I did and copy or modify whatever so it works for you.

i have a link in my sig

Maybe find a used York for $50-$75 and a used electric start engine (small honda or Briggs) and rig them together. You could probably make it work that you have to start it yourself but use the pressure switch and a relay as your kill switch. I’ve considered doing this setup in my truck.

Just an option (brainstorm) that you could probably pull of pretty close to your price range…

You’ll need to fabricate a bracket as there’s just not enough demand for this for there to be a host of pre-made brackets available. Most people who do this for Silvys mount to the right of the alternator – with a bracket that’s mated to the alternator & power steering pump bracket. Be sure to allow for forward/backward play so that you can adjust belt alignment. This means you should be sure the York you use can have its oil checked from the right-hand oil port (when the York is facing you), since the left will be up against the side of your bracket … which is mated to the alternator & power steering pump bracket.

I strongly recommend a serp belt cluch, as slippage problems with v-belts have been observed at higher PSI levels. If you use a serp belt clutch then you can just buy a longer serp belt – which will necessitate playing with the length to find best fit. You can use the same belt routing you already have and simply insert the York between the alternator and power steering pump. This is how mine is done … and I have no slippage at 200 PSI.

IMPORTANT:
When designing a bracket, be sure NOT to remove the bushings through which the alternator mounting bolts are placed, as these bushings (which stick out a little bit through two guide loops in the bracket casting) are designed to cause the mounting bolts to pull the bushings directly against the alternator (which is then pulled to the back of the bracket casting by the bolts). i.e. The two front guide loops serve only as guides and inhibitors of movement; people who have removed the bushings and mated brackets directly against the front of the bracket casting have cracked the casting – because a direct mount without the bushing squeezes the metal loops toward the rear threads.

You’ll need to fabricate a bracket, as there’s just not enough demand for this for there to be a host of pre-made brackets available. Most people who do this for Silvys mount to the right of the alternator – with a bracket that’s mated to the OEM alternator & power steering pump bracket. Be sure to allow for forward/backward play so that you can adjust belt alignment. Also be sure the York you choose can have its oil checked from the right-hand oil port (when the York is facing you), since the left-hand oil port will be up against the side of your bracket … which is mated to the alternator & power steering pump bracket.

I strongly recommend a serp belt clutch, as A) this will avoid having to replace a pulley; B) it’ll automatically make use of the tensioner for your serp belt; and C) slippage problems with v-belts have been observed at higher PSI levels by some people. If you go this route then you can use the same belt routing you already have (i.e. OEM belt routing) – and simply insert the York between the alternator and power steering pump. This is how mine is done … and I have no slippage at 200 PSI. Of course, you will have to have a longer serp belt, so plan to play with the lengths to find the best fit. I routed a string for mine, then measured the string and bought A) a belt that was closest to the string’s length; B) the next size longer belt; and C) the next size shorter. I kept one and took back the two I didn’t use.

IMPORTANT:
When designing a bracket if you use the alternator bolts, be sure NOT to remove the bushings through which the alternator mounting bolts are placed, as these bushings (which stick out a little bit through two guide loops in the bracket casting) are designed to cause the mounting bolts to pull the bushings directly against the alternator (which is then pulled to the back of the bracket casting by the bolts). i.e. The two front guide loops serve only as guides and inhibitors of movement; people who have removed the bushings and mated brackets directly against the front of the bracket casting have cracked the casting – because a direct mount without the bushing squeezes the metal loops toward the rear threads.